Networking and Being Professional – The Two Gigs at the Cookie

These were my final gigs that I went to in terms of shadowing for my work-based learning. The first gig was on the 2nd of April and the next gig was on the 3rd of April.

With both gigs I was able to help straight away as I was comfortable with the venue and knew where most of the equipment was, for example cables, microphones, microphone stands. This was helpful to know as it made the set up of both gigs easier, calmer and more efficient. On both occasions we started setting up equipment at 5:00pm (with doors opening at 8:00pm on both gigs) and had set up everything we could such as doing mic checks and testing the monitors, by 6:30pm. On both occasions we were waiting for the bands to arrive for at least 15 minutes after we had set up everything.

With the first gig I was shadowing an engineer that had been working part-time at the Cookie for a couple of years and with the second gig I was shadowing an engineer who had 25 years experience in live engineering. However even with the difference of experience between them they still showed professionalism in their jobs, which was apparent when the bands turned up. On both occasions the first thing they would do is greet the bands and welcome them to the venue if the band hadn’t played there before. As the bands that were playing were experienced musicians they were professional and polite, which made the sound check run smoothly. As can happen, there were some problems, with either microphones or cable connections but they were dealt with before doors opened.

After both gigs had finished both engineers were talking to the bands and some that had played as well as audience members, while I put the equipment away. In this instance it could be mistaken that I was doing all the work, putting things away, while the engineers were chatting to the bands.

However I was more than willing to do anything I could to help and that if I was to engineer a gig by myself I would need to get used to setting up and packing away the equipment for the gig on my own.

Furthermore the engineers weren’t just chatting to bands and audience members for fun but instead networking. I knew this because once I had put the equipment away I was introduced to some of the bands and audience members by the engineers on both nights. This was a vital skill that I knew would be good to do at every gig, as networking is what can get you your next job. Having the experience and meeting new people I otherwise wouldn’t have done on he night made me realise that one good gig could open doors to many more meaning every gig is as important as the next one, so networking and being professional can pay off in the short an long term of being a live sound engineer.

The stage was well lit and presented, being ready for the gig to start

The stage was well lit and presented, being ready for the gig to start

There was a lot less to prepare with the second gig as the acts were just singers and guitarists with the final band having a percussionist.

There was a lot less to prepare with the second gig as the acts were just singers and guitarists with the final band having a percussionist.

These were two short videos taken from the first gig. The levels were good on the desk and the sound was clear and loud from the front of house speakers. Most importantly the crowd were enjoying the gig and there were no complaints.

Video 1 URL – (https://youtu.be/NVS_FiszgnQ)

Video 2 URL – (https://youtu.be/hM7xbomg6ik)

WBL = 12 Hours

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